Ryan Kirby Art

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Artists CAN Read…and Should

The Wild Life, Inside Ryan's StudioRyan KirbyComment
Photo by  Paul Sherar

Photo by Paul Sherar

If a successful career is like climbing Everest, I'm still at base camp.

By no means have I reached the summit of artistic achievement (and probably never will - that's the point). But I've improved dramatically over the past few years, and I credit most of that to an eagerness to learn, read, and accept criticism from people I respect. I get hit up all the time on social media from other artists asking where to start and what books to buy. So here's a list of books I highly recommend to improve at art, business and life in general.

ART

Alla Prima, by Richard Schmid. Richard is an incredibly talented artist, and this book covers the broad spectrum of what it takes to be a great artist - everything from mixing color to keeping a fresh perspective and mindset while you paint. It's a must read. I'd also recommend his DVDs as well to watch the man at work.

Carl Rungius: Artist and Sportsman, by Karen Wonders. Carl Rungius was the freaking man. An adventurous hunter, a rugged individualist and an adept wildlife artist, Rungius traveled to the most remote parts of North America and painted species that most people had yet to see even in photographs. His stories of hunting, travel and art are fascinating.

Wild Harvest: The Animal Art of Bob Kuhn, by Bob Kuhn. Probably one of the world's most respected wildlife artist, Bob Kuhn's use of action and his accuracy in depicting anatomy are unparalleled. My in-laws bought me a copy of this book, signed by Bob himself, for Christmas last year and I've read through it 4 times already. Just studying his work before I paint is inspirational.

Color Choices, by Stephen Quiller. Art is like sports. You have to master the technical fundamentals before you can really cut loose. Jordan mastered left handed dribbling and good shooting form before he could crossover and hit a fadeaway. Painting is similar - you have to learn how to mix color and apply paint before you can put what's in your head onto canvas.

BUSINESS

Linchpin, by Seth Godin. Be great at what you do. Period. Seth is a marketing genius and will challenge you to be indispensable. A linchpin. The one that goes above and beyond to make a customer happy and get a job done when nobody else will. He'll also encourage you to launch your work and fine tune it as you go - don't get cold feet from perfectionism.

Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcom Gladwell. What makes a person successful? You'd be surprised. It's a combination of things, including talent, timing, resources and the courage to seize opportunities. It's never, ever just handed over to you. Nobody is an overnight success, but at the same time, it takes more than just hard work. This is a great read.

Ask Gary Vee, by Gary Vaynerchuck. Listen to his podcasts. Read his books. Ignore some of his language. Gary Vaynerchuck is an unbelievable success at business and marketing, especially in today's age of digital and social media. You'll learn lots of practical ways to grow your business, build a brand and market your services, with no shortcuts or gimmicks.

LIFE

The Bible. Especially Proverbs. I read a chapter every day before I read anything else. Proverbs covers craftsmanship, diligence, relationships, family, business, money, character - all of it. You'd be amazed at how little humanity has changed in thousands of years, and how truths of the Bible apply just as much today as when they were first written.

The Power of Positive Thinking, by Norman Vincent Peale. In Alla Prima (above) Richard Schmidt says that your mindset will affect how well you paint more than anything else. You've got to get right in the head if you expect to get right on canvas (or anything else in life). Norman Vincent Peale is an old-school preacher that published this book in 1953. He's got a very practical way of looking at challenges, faith, and life that I like. I typically read this at the end of the day or when I'm in a bind.

HUNTING STORIES

Hunting Trips of a Ranchman & The Wilderness Hunter, by Theodore Roosevelt. These guys were tough, rugged, adventurous and resolute. I love these old stories of guys that hunted simply because they loved chasing game and had a taste for wilderness. No sponsorships. No rangefinders. Just woodsmanship and sheer grit.

Father Water, Mother Woods; Essays on Fishing and Hunting in the North Woods, by Gary Paulsen. Nothing is more pure than a kid's unbridled love for hunting and fishing. This is a collection of stories from decades ago about boys who spent every spare minute lost in northern Minnesota's woods and waters. Their poverty forced them to be creative and resourceful in ways only country boys can be. It's a great read to remind us why we all hunt and fish in the first place.

 

Full Circle

Wildlife Art Prints, Inside Ryan's Studio, HuntingRyan KirbyComment

I cut my teeth at the National Wild Turkey Federation.

My first real job after college, I spent several years there as a graphic designer and illustrator, working on magazines, advertising and various print and web projects. It was a great place to work, and I made some of the most meaningful friendships of my life there.

NWTF headquarters had an incredible working environment. Not only were we working for a meaningful cause, but their was a passion for hunting and conservation that bled through the entire organization. We'd shoot bows at the range during lunch, train labs in the pond outside the office, and shoot all sorts of guns and video on the property. Even when I was in our graphics cave doing actual work, I got to work with turkey photos and content centered on hunting and conservation. Pretty sweet gig. 

But the biggest thrill for me was to see behind the scenes into the NWTF Banquet Art Program. Art has been an important part of NWTF Hunting Heritage banquets since day one, well over 40 years ago. Artists from across the country submit their work to the NWTF, whose crew whittles down the entries to a select few pieces of art that they believe will resonate best with their membership. Once selected, the NWTF prints around 1,800 canvas or paper prints and brings the artist to headquarters to sign and number each one of them.

I remember walking down the hallway and seeing guys like Bruce Miller, Greg Alexander, James Hautman and Pat Pauley sitting at a table, signing and numbering their art. I always mustered the courage to introduce myself, compliment their work, and start up a conversation about deer hunting or art. They were great dudes, each of them willing to offer advice, and I even brought my paintings in for them to critique. I learned a lot from them, and to this day see their work as some of the best in the business.  

Four years ago this spring, I launched out on my own as an artist and left NWTF headquarters in the rear view mirror. We still continue to work together, and now I have the honor and privilege of being an NWTF artist myself. This fall I spent two full days working through a stack of 1,800 canvas gicless of "Sons of Thunder" and the 2016 NWTF Stamp Print "A Place in the Sun II." Most people don't realize this, but from the first brushstroke on canvas to the moment an NWTF member places the winning bid at auction, every framed print is handcrafted by hard working Americans. My old buddy Jason Rikard prints the art at headquarters in Edgefield, SC, and together we sign off on the quality of each and every print off the press. The hard working fellas in the warehouse even cut and assemble the frames by hand before shipping them to Hunting Heritage banquets across the country. Those guys assemble quality frames so fast it'll make your head spin.

As we head into 2016, do me one favor: find your local NWTF Hunting Heritage Banquet and go to it. You'll have fun. You'll meet people in your community. You'll win stuff. You'll eat well. And you'll have the opportunity to put a well crafted piece of fine art on your wall. Most importantly, you'll ensure that your kids and grandkids will grow up to enjoy the same wild places that you and I have. And as you hang those two gobbling longbeards on the wall to share with friends and family, know that it took a tremendous amount of pride and craftsmanship to create. And it was created for you.